Questions to ask an employer or recruiter about a job

These are the things recruiters would like job seekers to ask when they call for a job posting – as well as what they would like not to ask.

CAREERS ‘expert recruiting panel answers a reader’s question every week. Have a question? Send an email to careers_qs@news.com.au

What are the right questions job seekers should ask when calling about a job posting?

Lisa Morris

Director,

Hay

When you call for more information about a job posting, your goal is to confirm that you are a suitable candidate. If your application is unlikely to be considered, you might be better off spending your time applying for a more suitable job. So focus your questions on finding out more about the ideal candidate, such as priority skills sought, “must haves” and the overall key objective of the position. Be sure to phrase your questions in a way that helps you clarify any details that are not clear in the ad, rather than information you might have found online. You can also ask questions about the hiring manager’s expectations of the application, such as the number of pages on your CV, if anything in particular needs to be underlined, and how long the selection process will take.

Megan Nicholson

Andrew Sullivan

General manager,

Sullivan Consulting

A general rule of thumb is to ask specific questions instead of general or general questions, as job descriptions will often provide the answer to most general questions. If a complete job description is not available, don’t hesitate to request one! It’s usually worth asking questions about a company’s corporate culture, as it will dramatically affect your work experience and can be difficult to describe in writing. Hours or schedules, workplace arrangements, expected skills and in some cases salary are other important topics to discuss.

Alexandra rosser

Responsible for the organization Psychology consultation,

Stillwell management Advisers

Depending on what is described in the advertisement, the questions could relate to the skills, personal suitability and level of experience sought, the physical location of the job, the range of compensation offered and to whom the job falls. . Other questions may include asking how the opportunity presented itself (for example, was it a newly created role or did someone leave it), how many people report to the person in the role, what is the composition and structure of the team and what is the structure and culture. Questions about specific working conditions that are essential to you may also be relevant again depending on the context. What is essential is not to ask for anything that is clearly answered in the advertisement, although you can clarify anything that is subject to interpretation.

For more career information, tips, and answers to reader questions, visit adelaidenow.com.au/careers


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